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Review of "Flow Yoga"

By Jennifer Lynn
Balance Vector Production, 2008
Review by Christian Perring on Oct 14th 2008
Flow Yoga

The Flow Yoga with Jennifer Lynn DVD has two workouts, one of 45 minutes for beginners, and one of 75 minutes at the intermediate level.  The workouts are good, and they are easy to follow.  There is also a short (rather preachy) introduction and a 23-minute tutorial about the principles involved in yoga and explanations of how to achieve the best postures.  The shorter workout features Jennifer and a companion, with occasional shots of other locations included.  It starts off with simple stretching, and then goes on with lunges, spinal twists, sun salutations, balances, warrior poses, triangle, locust poses, bridge poses, leg stretches, and hip stretches, ending with a rest.  Lynn gives her instructions in a voice-over with eastern-flavored music in the background.  She includes her own philosophy, saying things like "love is who we are" and "love is the only true source of power," which not everyone will agree with, but it is easy to tune those parts out.  The longer intermediate workout is shot in the same studio, but it features a whole class of ten students, with some shots also done outside in the sun on the grass.  It is not radically different from the introductory workshop.  It starts off with sun salutations, and goes to more advanced stages that will be very challenging to some -- such as side-crow -- and these are optional.  Both workouts are well designed and satisfying.

The DVD menu screen is rather confusing, and it seemed to me that sometimes the picture looks distorted in the screen ratio 4:3 (normal TV), and looks better in 16:9 (widescreen), especially on close-ups.  At points, neither screen ratio looks right.  Not all TVs and computer DVD players allow you to adjust the screen ratio, so this may be an issue to check before purchasing the DVD if you get bothered by slight distortions of screen images.   When selecting the chapters of each of the workouts, it is hard to know which chapter you want because they are just labeled with numbers rather than descriptive titles. 

Although the production quality is a bit basic, and it is a little hard to navigate the different parts of the DVD, the workouts themselves are quite interesting and distinctive.  With some more resources and more guidance from a director to curtail the unnecessary metaphysical claims, Lynn could made a really excellent yoga DVD.  While flawed, this DVD is still good and should appeal to some yoga practitioners.

Link: Jennifer Lynn website.

© 2008 Christian Perring

Christian Perring, Associate Professor of Philosophy, Dowling College, New York.

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